Neighborhood

Bronx - Riverdale

 

Riverdale is about three square miles in area. It is bordered on the north by the city of Yonkers, Westchester County, New York; to the east by Van Cortlandt Park and the Kingsbridge section of the Bronx; to the west by the Hudson River; and to the south by the Harlem River.Housing in Riverdale ranges from multi-story apartment buildings dating from the 1950s and 60s to large, architecturally distinguished houses built in the early 20th century, mostly in Georgian- and Tudor-revival styles. It is also hometo the modernist landmark Saul Victor house, designed by Ferdinand Gottlieb in 1967. Other famous mansions in Hudson Hill include: Greyston (1864), Alderbrook (1880), Stonehurst (1861) and Oaklawn (1863). Since 2005, Central Riverdale has experienceda building boom with the addition of many mid- and high-rise condominium buildings.

Bronx - Riverdale

Riverdale was a nineteenth century real estate district where lots of Manhattan's nineteenth century moguls built their own country estates. At the switch of the century, the new rise in popularity of rail travelling resulted in wealthy business men made Riverdale their year-round dwelling. The Fieldston neighborhood, because it is owned by an exclusive as sociati, is an especially undamaged instance of a turn-of-the century upper class suburban area. The Hudson Hill neighborhood keeps quite a lot of it shistoricalmansions. Riverdale's elite exclusive schools and historic churches also reflect this past.
As the twentieth century progressed, apartment buildings as well as smaller houses were added to Riverdale, although Riverdale continues to keep its character as a relatively affluent enclave in the city of New York.
Celebrated orchestra conductor Arturo Toscanini made his long lasting U.S. residence in Riverdale, right after havingto flee Italy due to Mussolini's hatred of him.
The rich history of Riverdale has resulted inthe creation of the Riverdale Historic District. The complete area is bound roughly by 252nd and 254th Streets and Palisade and Independence Avenues. Leland Weintraub, the commissioner who moved for the district's creation, noted that "most of the features commonly associated with the American romantic suburb of the mid-19th century," such as "a picturesque site, landscaping and architecture; connection to the city by accessible transportation and a layout adapted to the topography" can be foundin the area.